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Honeycomb Trypophobia

If you try surveying, you would see that there are lots of people who are afraid of seeing holes, whether it is on their body, on a branch of a tree, on a flower or even with honeycomb. Seeing those holes only make them have goose bumps that they don’t like at all.

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Bot Flies

Most people with trypophobia fear the bot fly and what it can do to the human body. A bot fly is a species of fly that lays its larvae within the bodies of warm blooded mammals. There are 150 bot fly species that all rely on mammals as there host. One species closely related to trypophobia is the the Dermatobia hominis. This is the only species of bot fly know to trypophobia sufferers to use humans to host its larvae which usually ends up in a large gaping trypophobia related hole in the skin.

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Hair Plugs

The fear of holes in the skin is sometimes connected with hair plugs, but it might also be considered as a deviation of the bot flies fear. This is a special condition, and the rare cases of bot fly made some specialist to neglect the existence of the trypophobe condition.

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Picture Of the Week!

Trypophobia.net

Source: Daily Mail

This beach looks incredible from afar, but as you see the pictures up close it only gets worse. over 5,000  pairs of Cormorants can be seen nesting on just over 21,000 square feet! Talk about a good dose of Trypophobia! Each of the birds nest has anywhere from 1 to 5 eggs, The eggs take about 5 weeks to hatch! This particular beach is protected to allow the seabirds to breed in peace. Check out the awesome photos below!

 

 

 

Sourch: Daily Mail

Sourch: Daily Mail

Source: Daily Mail

Source: Daily Mail

Trypophobia Picture Of the Week!

The Tomato Hornworm

Hornworm

Does the Tomato Hornworm give you a Trypophobia feeling?  If you want to see more find us on Facebook!The Tomato Hornworm usually doesnt have cocoons on the outside of its skin like this. A tiny insect called the braconid wasp lays its eggs inside the hornworm caterpillar where then hatch into larvae that feed on the hornworm’s muscle tissues. This largely paralyzes the hornworm, which becomes merely a living fresh food vessel that sustains the wasp larvae. Once the braconid larvae mature, which takes about a week, they then exit through a small  hole they make in the hornworm’s skin and build a silken cocoon on the outside (as shown in the photograph) within which, like butterflies, they transform into adult braconid wasps that then fly off to infect other tomato hornworms. Different species of braconid wasps parasitize aphids and many other harmful insects.

To see more Trypophobic Pictures visit our Trypophobic Pictures of the week page!
hornworm Hornworm